Posts Tagged ‘meditation’

Is Samadhi the group meditation of the adepts?

Friday, April 8th, 2011

This from A Treatise on White Magic, pp 89-90

“As the man seeks to reach control of the mind, the soul in its turn becomes more actively aggressive. The work of the solar Angel has hitherto been largely in its own world and concerned with its relation to spirit, and with this the man, working through his cycles on the physical plane, has had no concern. The main expenditure of energy by the soul has been general, and outward-going into the fifth kingdom. Now the solar Angel approaches a time of crisis and of reorientation. In the early history of humanity there was a great crisis which we call individualization. At that time the solar Angels, in response to a demand or a pull from the race of animal-men (as a whole, note that), sent a portion of their energy, embodying the quality of mentalisation, to these animal-men. They fecundated, if I might so express it, the brain. Thus was humanity brought into being. This germ, however, carried within it two other potentialities, that of spiritual love and spiritual life. These must in due time make their appearance.
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Frogs and kings

Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010

And I’ve got an emptiness deep inside and I’ve tried but it won’t let me go. as Neil Diamond’s song about the frog who became a king goes. Not even becoming a king helped the protagonist with this one. And why is that? Because it seems to me the core of our being is that very emptiness that we feel uncomfortable with, which is the reason why it won’t let the protagonist go.

Meditation on the other hand embraces that emptiness. It’s nothing to run away from or avoid, it is who we are, and the more we come to know it the more we become our true selves. At least in my understanding and experience.

The message from society is indeed that we must become somebody, which inherently means somebody else. And we absorb that with gusto. One of my friends left the following post on Facebook the other day

It is difficult for the mind to accept emptiness. Think of it like you’re unconditioning the mind to realise that it’s not any of the content that it’s been clogging itself up with. Not a single piece of that content. Once you begin to realise this, you begin to have the freedom to choose your own content, at the same time realising that you’ve chosen it. And why would you do this? Because there is content that makes you miserable and content that makes you happy.

Whatever you put in is relative and short lived and at the same time whatever you put in is going to condition the mind. So choose very carefully because this creates the new you. Yet choose lightly because it’s not you.

The you which is permanent is empty. Nothing there and there’s nothing to be done. The impermanent you? Develop the skills to turn the illusory frog into an illusory king by all means. That’s magic.

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More difficulties

Wednesday, September 1st, 2010

Something else I thought of about the benefit of difficult meditations is that by keeping on sitting through them and bringing the mind back to attention of awareness or attention of the breath, you are building an incredibly valuable skill. What you are doing is telling your mind that whatever you are experiencing mindfulness is most important. And back into life the benefits of training your mind give you strength.

This lead me to thinking about what are the qualities other than mindfulness needed to bring the mind to stillness; antidotes if you like. Forgiveness and acceptance are the obvious ones, both of oneself and others. Selflessness because of the snare of desire and the delusion of trying to maintain an identity. And paradoxically faith in oneself, that you’ll get through things. Commitment because we have responsibilities in the world and we can trust ourselves to meet those to the best of our ability, so stop worrying. Mindfulness of connectedness because that’s what makes us whole.

What do you think?

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